Nap’s are necessary for both the young and elderly, studies have shown that although they don’t make up for inadequate or poor nighttime sleep,  they do improve mood & alertness.  

 

Naps are are also an important part of some cultures, sadly this does not include North America, which is one of the most sleep deprived continents, due to busy life styles.  Infact, its more common to boast about how you can thrive on little sleep and still get the job done.

 

Naps (or lack of) is one of the most common topics brought up in email inquiries, presentations and consultations.

 

Here are some of the most commonly asked questions and statements

 

How do I get my baby to nap?

How to organize naps?

How long should a nap be?

How do I get my baby to sleep past 30 minutes?

My baby fights naps – what should I do?

My baby won’t go down for a nap?

My baby will sleep and night but won’t nap 

 

Here are some napping tips:

 

To have  good naps, nighttime sleep has to be good – take a look at your babies overnight sleep, is it of good quality? 

 

Your baby has to be able to put themselves to sleep – do they? 

 

Make sure you are using the right awake window between naps so that your baby is ready to sleep, but not ASLEEP when they go down.

 

Understand that babies often cry before falling to sleep as they have no other outlet to relax.

 

Nap training takes around 6 weeks, and its a two-fold process, they have to not only learn how to fall to sleep, they also have to learn how to go back to sleep.

 

Consistency and commitment, if you want your baby to learn this skill, you must have the time to dedicate to it.

 

From a learning curve perspective, nap 1 is usually the easiest nap for a baby to go down to sleep for and sleep through a sleep cycle transition, nap 2 is more challenging and nap 3 can be hit and miss! 

 

 

Download the awake window chart here

 

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